Jesus Could Not Have Atoned for Our Sins

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https://www.facebook.com/CenterforTanakhBasedStudies?fref=ts
By: William J Jackson

Jesus Could Not Have Atoned for Our Sins.

Easter blots out Passover in our culture. It’s sad because YHVH said to remember His Passover from generation to generation (Exodus 12:14, 17, 24, 13:9-10, 2 Kings 23:21). However, in Christianity Easter is very important because the Christian messiah is credited for removing the sins of his followers( 1 Peter 1:18, 1 Corinthians 6:20, Romans 6:18, 8:2 ). In short, Jesus, has taken the place of the Israelites sacrificial lamb. Ironically, the lamb in Exodus 12 was slaughtered for it’s blood to put on the doorframe so the angel of death would “Passover” (Pesach) the homes of believers. Call it a mark of faith. It seems, this lamb, has been tangled up with the lamb sacrificed for atonement. This sacrificial lamb would be talked about a year after the Passover and some 450 miles away (1) in the book of Leviticus chapter 4. The piece that makes Jesus important is the atoning for the sins of those who believe in him. What does the Tanakh (Old Testament) say about somebody paying your sins?

The Tanakh is pretty clear that everyone shall die of there own sins (Deuteronomy 24:16, Jeremiah 31:28-29, 2 Chronicles 25:4, 2 Kings 14:5-6), meaning no one can take that responsibility from us. The first time we see someone trying to interceded with their own life for somebody else’s sins is Moses. This happened right after the golden calf incident (Exodus 32:1-20). Moses went to YHVH to exchange his life for the Israelites who sinned (Exodus 32:31-32). YHVH was quick to turn him down by saying “…I will punish them for their sin” (Exodus 32:34). So not even Moses can blot out somebody else’s sin.

You see, us dealing with our sins is part of the growing process. Lets go back to the beginning when Adonai accepted Abel’s sacrifice and not Cain’s. If you remember, Cain became pretty angry (Genesis 4:4-5). So, Adonai counseled Cain on his attitude problem (Genesis 4:6). Adonai didn’t tell Cain that he would take his sin from him, He didn’t even tell Cain just to surrender his anger. Adonai told Cain to master over his sin (Genesis 4:7). Part of dealing with our sin is growing and maturing, so hopeful through our true repentance (teshuvah, 2), we move on. HaShem’s word tells us that the righteous man will fail again and again; but through YHVH’s word, he will prevail (Proverbs 24:16, Psalm 34:20, 37:24, Job 5:19). Life is a learning curve, we don’t just change we evolve. It’s not about handing over our responsibilities, it’s about battling and succeeding over sin.

Ezekiel 18 goes into pain staking detail explaining how each person is accountable for their own walk, and how we cannot assume anyone’s punishment or how they cannot assume ours. Life is not about the finish line, it’s about the journey. And we certainly cannot hand over the challenge of sin to a deity (Matthew 6:13, John 17:15, 1 John 3:8, Galatians 1:4). We, instead, look towards YHVH and His word for reassurance. As Rabbi Stuart Federow has said “The Bible is clear, and it is consistent: one person cannot die for the sins of another. In other words, the sins committed by one person cannot be wiped out by the punishment given to another” (3).

References:

(1) Google Maps, Cairo, Cairo Governorate, Egypt to Jabal Mousa

(2) TESHUVAH (Repentance) Handout, Biblical Heritage Center

(3) Rabbi Stuart Federow, Jews believe that one person’s death
cannot atone for the sins of another, What Jews believe

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